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Monthly Archives: June 2019

Meet the Team: Allison MacLeod

None of what is happening at Phantom Creek Estates would be possible without the incredible team behind it. With our Meet the Team Series, we will be introducing the individuals who are working hard to make all of this possible.

Where were you born and raised, Allison?

I was born in Calgary and raised in Canmore, Alberta.

Did you do a lot of outdoor sports in Canmore?

I was put on skis and hauled up mountains at a very young age, as is the norm in Canmore. Despite that, I did tend to veer more toward indoor team sports as I grew older.

What drew you to the Okanagan?

Mountains, beaches, sunshine and great wine!

How did you first hear about Phantom Creek?

I could see the construction site from my backyard and decided to do a little research. At that point, they had only dug the foundation and we joked about the worlds largest sandcastle being erected on the Black Sage Bench. Looks a little different these days…

What is your position at Phantom Creek?

My position is Cellar Master.

Which are your other favorite wines or wineries locally or around the world?

For whites, I am a sucker for German or Alsatian Riesling. For reds, something massive from South Australia.

You’ve recently adopted a rescue dog, please tell us EVERYTHING

Yes! His name is Toro. He is a 5-year-old Pitbull that was found in a ditch in Mexico after being hit by a car. He was brought back to Canada and rehabilitated for a year at the Bow Valley SPCA which is where I found him. Toro likes walks, digging up my garden, sunbathing and snacks. 

Rolling Stones or Beatles?

Beatles!

What would people surprised to know about you?

Probably nothing, I’m a pretty open book.

How do you define success?

I will borrow from Maya Angelou for this: “success is liking yourself, liking what you do, and liking how you do it.”

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Bird-watching in the South Okanagan

The Osoyoos and Oliver region are known world-wide for bird watching. From Haynes Point to Vaseaux Lake, gorgeous species can be seen frequently. Peregrine Falcons, White-headed Woodpeckers, Northern Saw-whet Owls, Sage Thrashers, and Yellow-breasted Chats are just a few of the incredible birds found here. At Phantom Creek Estates, we see some of these beautiful birds flying about.

Adjacent to the Oxbows, the SORCO (South Okanagan Rehabilitation Centre) is located. Here, they nurture and rehabilitate injured Raptors (birds of prey). There are multiple conservation projects aimed at protecting and preserving this unique and gorgeous area. We are grateful for to the many organizations determined to preserve these lands and protect the wildlife that call them home.

Below are some suggested bird-watching sites in the area:

Haynes Point Provincial Park

2 kms south of Osoyoos, Haynes Point Provincial Park is the home to Red-winged Blackbirds, Great-horned Owls, Canyon Wrens, White-throated Swifts, and many others. You can walk down the gravel trail for up to 45 minutes, where a “dog swimming area” awaits you and your furry companions at the end.

Osoyoos Desert Centre

A facility dedicated to preserving the natural Desert environment, visitors can walk along the boardwalk and read about the various elements that make up this unique and beautiful area. While visiting, keep an eye out for Golden Eagles, Mountain Bluebirds, Red-tailed Hawks, and Hummingbirds. As it can get very hot, during summer months it is recommended to visit earlier in the day.

Osoyoos Oxbows

An expansive wetland located along both sides the Okanagan River, the Oxbows are home to many species. When here, keep an eye out for Osprey, various species of Owls, Cinnamon Teal, the Yellow-breasted Chat, among many others.

NK’MIP Desert Cultural Centre

At the NK’MIP Desert Cultural Centre, guided and self-guided walks are provided to anyone interested in experiencing the area in its natural state. The walks focus on how the Desert land was used by the First Nations people. Here, you can spot White-throated Swifts, Lark Sparrows, Brewer’s Sparrows, and if you’re lucky, you might even get to the see the elusive Black-throated Sparrow.

Vaseaux Lake Wildlife Centre

On Highway 97, between Oliver and Okanagan Falls, Vaseaux Lake Wildlife Centre boasts a 400-m boardwalk along the lakeshore. Here, you can see Bluebirds, Woodpeckers, Swallows, Western Meadowlarks, and Trumpeter Swans, among many others.

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Phantom Creek In the News: June 2019

A lot has been happening at Phantom Creek Estates lately. Construction of our Hospitality Center continues and nears completion, our freshly planted Evernden Spring Vineyard begins to grow, and our wines continue to generate buzz in the wine world. We have collected some recent articles and publications and are excited to share them.

Jancis Robinson at the Canada House tasting in London

After our visit to London and the Canada House Tasting, wine critic Jancis Robinson awarded our Pinot Gris the highest score for BC white wines, which was 17 out of 20. Here are some of her notes on our wines:

2017 Pinot Gris – 17/20: I’m surprised that there has not been more Pinot Gris shown in this tasting. This one is so recognisably Alsace influenced! A little residual sugar and real toasty breadth on the palate. Yet thoroughly broachable and satisfying already. Food friendly. Brighter fruit than many Alsace examples. Peachy but not fat. 13%. Drink 2019-2022.

2017 Riesling – 15++/20: Olivier Humbrecht is consulting – both visiting and distantly. Pretty much all stainless steel whereas Olivier wants to introduce foudres. New winemaker from Carrick, Central Otago is arriving any minute. This is really pretty simple as a Riesling so I’m sure Olivier will beef it up a bit. Good chewiness on the end. But the flavours seem a little too reined in. Austere in the extreme. 12%. Drink 2020-2023.

2016 Syrah – 16.5/20: Really strong sage notes on the nose. Rather more complex nose than some but not that distinctively varietal. Certainly fully ripe but with fresh acidity. A good drink. 14.5%. Drink 2019-2023.

2016 Becker Vineyard Cuvée – 16.5/20: Originally planted to German varieties by Helmut Becker in the 1970s and converted to the three Bordeaux red wine grapes in the 1990s. 39% Merlot, 35% Cabernet Franc, 26% Cabernet Sauvignon. Inky, silky, polished, glamorous red. With a touch of sage. Pretty exciting by any measure. Softer than the Phantom Creek Vineyard. 14.5%. Drink 2019-2023.

2016 Phantom Creek Vineyard Cuvée – 16.5/20: 38% Cabernet Sauvignon, 26% Petit Verdot, 15% Malbec, 8% Syrah, 8% Cabernet Franc, 5% Merlot. Deep purplish crimson. Six different varieties and a little savoury undertow thanks to the 8% Syrah. Interesting wine. Well made. Very slightly sweet overall. 14.5%. Drink 2020-2025.

Click here to order the 17 point Pinot Gris

John Schreiner on Wine

Esteemed wine critic John Schreiner recently published an article in which he writes of his experience with our wines. He writes that Phantom Creek Owner, Bai Jinping, “set out to make outstanding wines in Canada,” and that “he certainly succeeded.” He continues to write about the history and future of Phantom Creek Estates, and provides his notes and scores on fives of our wines:  

2017 Pinot Gris – 92 points: The texture is luscious. The wine beings with aromas of pear and a hint of oak. On the palate, there are flavors of ripe pear and apple with a touch of spice on the lingering finish.

2017 Riesling – 91 points: This wine is crisp and dry, with lime on the nose and palate and with a spine of minerality.

2016 Becker Vineyard Cuvée – 93 points: The wine has aromas of black cherry and cassis that are echoed on the palate. The long ripe tannins give the wine a generous mouthfeel and a lingering finish.

2016 Phantom Creek Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon – 95 points: An excellent vintage has produced an exceptional Cabernet Sauvignon, with aromas of cherry, black currant, blueberry and vanilla; all of that is echoed on the palate. This wine, aged 18 months in French oak, is complex, with a polished texture. 95.

2016 Phantom Creek Vineyard Cuvée – 96 points: This is a bold, rich wine with aromas and flavors of cherry, black current, plum and vanilla. It was aged 18 months in French oak. Long ripe tannins support the opulent texture and the persistent finish of this delicious wine. 96.

Click here to find the full review: https://johnschreiner.blogspot.com/2019/06/phantom-creek-releases-its-first-wines.html

Click here to order the 96 point Phantom Creek Cuvee

Western Living – June, 2019 Issue

In the June, 2019 issue of Western Living published an article on Phantom Creek Estates. Titled ‘Reach for the Top’, the two page spread covers the inception and execution of Phantom Creek Estates.

Click here to find the full article (page 46): https://issuu.com/canadawidemedia/docs/wl_june2019_lr_bc

Chris Boiling at Canopy

Chris Boiling covers the architecture, the team, the winemaking, the vineyards, and wines of Phantom Creek Estates in this article. Labeling it as “one of the most ambitious winery developments in Canada,” Boiling gives an in-depth look at our history, growth, and where we are currently.

As for the wines, he writes that:

“Phantom Creek focuses on single-vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Alsatian whites and the Okanagan’s benchmark varieties of Viognier and Syrah. Prices range from $30 to $100 a bottle. Star wines include the 2016 Phantom Creek Vineyards Cuvée ($100) and the 2016 Phantom Creek Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon ($80), blended from three different clones to achieve complexity and depth. The 2016 Phantom Creek Vineyards Syrah ($75) is sourced from 1.2 acres which helped to establish the Okanagan as a source for Syrah with savoury complexity.”

Click here to find the full article: https://www.internationalwinechallenge.com/Canopy-Articles/phantom-winery-becomes-a-reality.html

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Meet the Team: John Pires

None of what is happening at Phantom Creek Estates would be possible without the incredible team behind it. With our Meet the Team Series, we will be introducing the individuals who are working hard to make all of this possible.

Where were you born and raised, John?

I was born in Portugal, where I stayed until I was 8, then I moved to France, where I lived until I was 19. Then back to Portugal where I got my teaching degree in French.

What brought you to the Okanagan?

I had come a few times on holiday (I had family here, three brothers) and I loved it. When my spouse, who lived in France for 14 years, got tired of living in a small town (in Portugal), we applied to immigrate to Canada.

What do you like most about living in the Okanagan?

Everything!

How long have you been working on the Black Sage Bench?

This is my 20th vintage.

How did you first hear about Phantom Creek?

I was working on a project with Anne Vawter and when Harry McWatters sold, I was asked if I wanted to stay with them. I am the first Phantom Creek employee.

What is your position at Phantom Creek?

Vineyard Manager for the Black Sage Bench Vineyards.

I hear you have a legendary wine collection, what’s your most prized bottle?

The one I open to enjoy with family and friends.

How many languages do you speak?

I am fluent in English, Portuguese, Spanish, and French, and can have a conversation in Italian.

Who are you rooting for in the playoffs?

None, I’m a die-hard Canuck.

If you were trapped on a desert island and you could only bring 3 books, what would they be?

Any book that would help me to survive.

Any advice for a newcomer to the wine industry?

You must do the work as if it was your own place.

What would people surprised to know about you?

I was a French teacher for 8 years.

How do you define success?

You are successful if you are happy in what you do.

Thanks John!

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Biodynamic Farming: Cover Crop

Organic farming is a prerequisite for biodynamic certification. However, biodynamics is much more prescriptive than organic certification. We are strong proponents of biodynamics because it codifies good farming practices. The aim is not just to forgo chemical pesticides and fertilizers, but also to foster a self-regulating ecosystem. This means minimizing any and all interventions in the vineyard.

Our transition to organic and biodynamic farming means more work by hand in the vineyard. To eliminate the use of herbicides, we use hand hoeing for weed control. However, certain plants, known as “cover crops” are kept and allowed to grow naturally. Cover crops are a natural source of nutrients, which can be tilled into the soil during growing season. Grapevines have low nutrient requirements, so we are careful to ensure that the vines are not overstimulated. By analyzing leaves from each individual block, our vineyard managers can precisely determine nutrient requirements block-by-block, and vineyard-by-vineyard. Rather than eliminating the surrounding vegetation, we want our vines to co-exist in harmony with the natural environment around them.

Yarrow, or Achillea Millefolium, for example, grows plentifully in vineyards in the South Okanagan. It has been used as a part of healing remedies for centuries and helps to loosen the soil where it grows, allowing the roots of other plants to penetrate the soil more easily. According to our Vineyard Manager, John Pires, “Yarrow is also good for preventing Cutworm; it is our friend.” Cutworms are the larvae of various species of night-flying moths and the Yarrow drives them away, preventing the Cutworms from eating and damaging vines.

Canada Bluegrass is another species of plant used as a cover crop. Also known as Poa compressa, Canada Bluegrass grow well in dry, well-trafficked areas. The roots of Canada Bluegrass have creeping root stalks that have soil-binding characteristics, which make them very useful for erosion control. It requires a lot of sun to grow, which makes it perfectly suited for the Black Sage Bench.

White Clover, or Trifolium repens, is also found in our vineyards. It is a good companion to the other surrounding plants as it has the ability to fix nitrogen, meaning that it converts the metabolically useless di-nitrogen into useful ammonia. Much like Yarrow, White Clover has historically been used in medicinal treatments and is grown and cultivated for many purposes.

Just as our winery is coloured to blend in with its surroundings, our vineyards coexist with the flora and fauna of the South Okanagan so they can work in unison. This helps to keep the surrounding environment healthy and balanced, and our vineyards more sustainable.

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